Leonard Sullivan-Oklahoma County Assessor, 320 Robert S. Kerr #313, Oklahoma City, OK 73102
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Oklahoma County Assessor
Facts and Questions



WHAT IS THE JOB OF THE COUNTY ASSESSOR?

  • The county assessor is responsible for the following:
    Lists and maintains records on each piece of taxable real and personal property in Oklahoma County.
    REAL PROPERTY includes land and buildings.  PERSONAL PROPERTY includes business furniture and fixtures, business equipment, business inventory, farm equipment, and manufactured homes.  As Oklahoma County Assessor, Leonard Sullivan is responsible for the equitable assessment of all taxable properties in Oklahoma County. Individual parcels now number close to 300,000 and cover an area of 720 square miles. An unprecedented amount of this information is now being made available in a variety of formats. Please follow this shortcut to view the Assessors Records Reproduction Policy.  Click Here Records Reproduction Policy.


  • Determines fair market value annually for homes, businesses and other taxable property in Oklahoma County.   Fair market value may go up or down depending on the real estate market in the county. 

 

 

 

  • Is your property subject to the 3% or 5% limitation also known as "Capped" Value?  Find out more how properties are "capped" regarding taxable market value changes here.

 

  • Notifies property owners of any increase in the fair market value of their property.
    Assists taxpayers in filing
    HOMESTEAD EXEMPTION and affidavits for property that is exempt under Oklahoma law.

  • Resolves questions or protests about valuation.
    Preparation and certification of the assessment and tax rolls.
    Appears before the
    COUNTY BOARD OF EQUALIZATION.


HOW DO I FIGURE MY TAX?

 

The method for figuring ad valorem taxes requires four steps: You must know the taxable market value of your property, the assessment ratio(11% Real Property - 13.75% Personal), any exemptions, and the tax rate for your area of the county. The example is based upon a property that has a taxable market value of $50,000 with homestead exemption and a tax rate of $100 per thousand. 




Estimate your tax using our tax calculator here .

In this example, the final tax bill is $450. This could vary if the district in which the property is located had higher or lower school, city or other bond issues. Rates generally vary from $86 to $134 per thousand within the county.
                                                                                                                       

HOW ARE TAX RATES SET FOR MY PROPERTY?
Tax rates or millage levies are set by procedures established in the Oklahoma Constitution or voted directly by the taxpayers. Rates are not set by the County Assessor. There are over 75 different rates in Oklahoma County and those vary across the county depending on which school district, city limit and vocational-technical school district the property is located. The tax or millage rate levied against a property makes a great deal of difference in the taxes paid. Rates in Oklahoma County have varied from $75 to $134 per thousand.


WHAT IS A MILL?
 A mill is one-thousandth of a dollar. For convenience in Oklahoma, a tax rate (the sum of all mills levied) is expressed as dollars per thousand dollars of assessed value. A Tax rate of 80 mills, for example, would be 80 tax dollars.


WHERE DOES MY PROPERTY TAX MONEY GO?
Property taxes are an important source of revenue for local schools, vocational-technical education, libraries, city and county government. As in most states in the United States, property taxes are the backbone of funding of local government and schools. Oklahoma’s property tax with some changes has fulfilled this basic function since statehood.

Generally, local schools receive the largest share of the property tax. Schools are followed by city bond issues, county government, vocational-technical schools, libraries, and city-county health department. Except for those provided for in the Oklahoma Constitution, millage levies are controlled by the voters.

As noted in the chart, ad valorem revenues in a typical year are distributed among several groups.

Oklahoma County Ad Valorem Tax Dollar



 

 

When do I pay my tax?
The County Treasurer sends out a tax bill in October each year. Taxes may be paid on two installments. If exactly one half is paid by December 31, then the last half is due by March 31. If nothing is paid by December 31, the full amount is due and becomes delinquent January 1 with applicable penalties owed.

 


Oklahoma Ranks 47th lowest in property taxes...............
only Mississippi, Alaska, & Alabama are lower....see story below

What about the notion of relocating to take advantage of lower taxes in other states? Although it's not for everyone, it appears that a growing number of people, particularly the wealthy, are doing just that. According to a 2006 article in Barron's, large numbers of taxpayers are moving from high-tax states to those with lower taxes. One of the big motivators is that 18 states and the District of Columbia have recently implemented significant estate taxes. Angered by high state and local taxes, residents of the Northeast are fleeing to Florida -- and not just for the sunnier weather. Florida has no income tax and no estate tax. Highly taxed Californians are making tracks to places such as Arizona and Nevada in record numbers..

In America, voting with one's feet remains a viable form of tax protest. But Alaska, despite its low taxes, probably won't witness any mass migrations from the lower 48 anytime soon. Unless you're talking about flocks of birds.

Taxes by state 
State Gasoline* Cigarettes Retail sales** All state, local taxes*** Rank All federal, state, local taxes*** Rank
Alabama 20.3 $0.42 4% 8.8% 46 27.5% 50
Alaska 8 $1.80   6.6% 50 27.9% 49
Arizona 19 $2.00 5.6 10.1% 32 29.9% 29
Arkansas 21.8 $0.59 6 10.3% 27 29.1% 40
California 40.1 $0.87 7.25 10.9% 15 32.7% 9
Colorado 22 $0.84 2.9 9.8% 38 30.7% 23
Connecticut 40.5 $1.51 6 11.3% 9 35.9% 1
Delaware 23 $0.55   8.4% 48 29.7% 33
Florida 31.9 $0.34 6 9.7% 39 31.0% 21
Georgia 21.3 $0.37 4 10.4% 25 30.6% 25
Hawaii 31.8 $1.60 4# 11.7% 5 31.2% 17
Idaho 25 $0.57 6 10.2% 31 29.0% 42
Illinois 32.5 $0.98 6.25 10.9% 14 32.7% 10
Indiana 26.6 $0.56 6 11.0% 12 30.7% 24
Iowa 22 $0.36 5 10.4% 26 29.4% 36
Kansas 25 $0.79 5.3 10.7% 18 30.5% 26
Kentucky 18.5 $0.30 6 10.7% 20 29.8% 31
Louisiana 20 $0.36 4 11.0% 11 29.2% 37
Maine 28.3 $2.00 5 13.5% 1 33.1% 7
Maryland 23.5 $1.00 5 10.7% 19 32.0% 13
Massachusetts 23.5 $1.51 5 10.3% 28 33.4% 6
Michigan 30.8 $2.00 6 10.8% 16 31.1% 19
Minnesota 22 $1.49 6.5 11.9% 4 33.6% 5
Mississippi 18.8 $0.18 7 10.2% 29 28.0% 48
Missouri 17.6 $0.17 4.225 9.9% 34 29.4% 35
Montana 27.8 $1.70   9.5% 42 29.0% 43
Nebraska 28 $0.64 5.5 11.6% 6 30.9% 22
Nevada 32.5 $0.80 6.5 9.5% 43 31.6% 14
New Hampshire 19.6 $0.80   7.3% 49 29.2% 39
New Jersey 14.5 $2.58 7 10.8% 17 34.3% 3
New Mexico 18 $0.91 5 9.9% 36 28.5% 45
New York 41.7 $1.50 4 12.9% 2 35.1% 2
North Carolina 30.2 $0.35 4.5 10.5% 23 30.3% 27
North Dakota 23 $0.44 5 9.8% 37 29.8% 30
Ohio 28 $1.25 5.5 12.0% 3 31.3% 16
Oklahoma 17 $1.03 4.5 9.6% 40 28.2% 47
Oregon 24.9 $1.18   9.9% 35 30.2% 28
Pennsylvania 32.3 $1.35 6 10.4% 24 31.2% 18
Rhode Island 31 $2.46 7 11.5% 8 33.0% 8
South Carolina 16.8 $0.07 5 10.2% 30 29.2% 38
South Dakota 24 $1.53 4 9.2% 45 28.9% 44
Tennessee 21.4 $0.20 7 8.6% 47 28.2% 46
Texas 20 $1.41 6.25 9.4% 44 29.7% 32
Utah 24.5 $0.70 4.75 10.5% 22 29.5% 34
Vermont 20 $1.79 6 11.1% 10 31.3% 15
Virginia 19.2 $0.30 5 9.5% 41 31.1% 20
Washington 34 $2.03 6.5 10.9% 13 33.7% 4
West Virginia 27 $0.55 6 10.6% 21 29.1% 41
Wisconsin 32.9 $0.77 5 11.6% 7 32.2% 12
Wyoming 14 $0.60 4 10.1% 33 32.4% 11
District of Columbia 20 $1.00 5.75 12.8%   35.1%  

*Additional federal levy is 18.4 cents nationwide

**Base state rate (local tax may be higher)

***Average, as percentage of income

#General excise tax instead of sales tax

Sources: Tax Foundation, Tax Policy Center, American Petroleum Institute, American Lung Association

Updated Feb. 8, 2007


CNN/Money ranks Oklahoma 5th nationally for best local property taxes!

 

 
 

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