Sentences

Deferred Sentence


You are not convicted of a crime until you are found guilty and punished for the crime. With a deferred sentence, the Judge finds you guilty of the crime but post pones, delays or defers sentencing until a later date (from one day to five years). If you do everything the court orders you to do, the court will dismiss your case and the charge will not appear on your record. You may be ordered to pay all court costs and fees, see a probation officer, go to treatment and make sure you do not break the law again. If you do not successfully complete the deferred sentence requirements or if you are charged with committing a "new" crime, the court may sentence you to jail or prison.

Suspended Sentence


You are convicted of a crime but are on probation for all or part of the sentence; it is suspended so you do not have to go to prison for that amount of time, as long as you satisfy the conditions of probation. The probation may be "supervised" or "unsupervised." If it is "supervised," you must regularly report to a probation officer. If it is "unsupervised," you simply must obey the rules of probation and not break the law. If you are unsuccessful, however, you may be sentenced to spend the entire sentence in jail or prison.